The scientific literature

Huge Growth in the Science Supporting Sulforaphane.

The science which supports the role of Sulforaphane in the optimal function and health of human cells has been growing at an exponential rate since the first papers were published in the early 1990s.

The links below will take you to the primary scientific literature where you can read either the Abstracts (summaries) or the full papers.

SULFORAPHANE REVIEW PAPERS by Cell-Logic’s Chief Scientific Officer, Dr Christine Houghton

2016;2016:7857186. doi: 10.1155/2016/7857186. Epub 2016 Jan 6.

Sulforaphane and Other Nutrigenomic Nrf2 Activators: Can the Clinician’s Expectation Be Matched by the Reality?

Abstract

The recognition that food-derived nonnutrient molecules can modulate gene expression to influence intracellular molecular mechanisms has seen the emergence of the fields of nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics. The aim of this review is to describe the properties of nutrigenomic activators of transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2), comparing the potential for sulforaphane and other phytochemicals to demonstrate clinical efficacy as complementary medicines. Broccoli-derived sulforaphane emerges as a phytochemical with this capability, with oral doses capable of favourably modifying genes associated with chemoprevention. Compared with widely used phytochemical-based supplements like curcumin, silymarin, and resveratrol, sulforaphane more potently activates Nrf2 to induce the expression of a battery of cytoprotective genes. By virtue of its lipophilic nature and low molecular weight, sulforaphane displays significantly higher bioavailability than the polyphenol-based dietary supplements that also activate Nrf2. Nrf2 activation induces cytoprotective genes such as those playing key roles in cellular defense mechanisms including redox status and detoxification. Both its high bioavailability and significant Nrf2 inducer capacity contribute to the therapeutic potential of sulforaphane-yielding supplements.

2013 Nov;71(11):709-26. doi: 10.1111/nure.12060. Epub 2013 Oct 22.

Sulforaphane: translational research from laboratory bench to clinic.

Abstract

Cruciferous vegetables are widely acknowledged to provide chemopreventive benefits in humans, but they are not generally consumed at levels that effect significant change in biomarkers of health. Because consumers have embraced the notion that dietary supplements may prevent disease, this review considers whether an appropriately validated sulforaphane-yielding broccoli sprout supplement may deliver clinical benefit. The crucifer-derived bioactive phytochemical sulforaphane is a significant inducer of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the transcription factor that activates the cell’s endogenous defenses via a battery of cytoprotective genes. For a broccoli sprout supplement to demonstrate bioactivity in vivo, it must retain both the sulforaphane-yielding precursor compound, glucoraphanin, and the activity of glucoraphanin’s intrinsic myrosinase enzyme. Many broccoli sprout supplements are myrosinase inactive, but current labeling does not reflect this. For the benefit of clinicians and consumers, this review summarizes the findings of in vitro studies and clinical trials, interpreting them in the context of clinical relevance. Standardization of sulforaphane nomenclature and assay protocols will be necessary to remove inconsistency and ambiguity in the labeling of currently available broccoli sprout products.